The image you missed

MIÉRCOLES 22 | CINETECA NACIONAL | 18:45 HRS. | 74 MIN.

VIERNES 24 | CINEMEX REFORMA-CASA DE ARTE | 20:00 HRS. | 74 MIN.

SÁBADO 25 | CASA DE EL HIJO DEL AHUIZOTE | 16:00 HRS. | 74 MIN,

** PRESENCIA DE DIRECTOR Q&A

The image you missed

Ireland – USA – France | 201 | DCP | Color | 73 min | Donal Foreman, Arthur MacCaig

Director: Donal Foreman
Producer: Donal Foreman, Nicole Brenez, Philippe Grandrieux
Cinematography: Sean Brennan, Donal Foreman, Piers McGrail
Music: Ohal Grietzer, Michael Buckley, Christopher Colm Morrin
Edition: Donal Foreman

Synopsis
An Irish filmmaker grapples with the legacy of his estranged father, the late documentarian Arthur MacCaig, through MacCaig’s decades spanning archive of the conflict in Northern Ireland. Drawing on over 30 years of unique and never-seen-before imagery, The Image You Missed is a documentary essay film that weaves together a history of the Northern Irish ‘Troubles’ with the story of a son’s search for his father. In the process, the film creates a candid encounter between two filmmakers born into different political moments, revealing their contrasting experiences of Irish
nationalism, the role of images in social struggle, and the competing claims of personal and political responsibility.

Donal Foreman
Donal Foreman was born in Dublin, 1985. He is an Irish filmmaker living in New York City. He has been making films since he was 11 years old. Since then, he has written, directed and edited over fifty short films, and in 2013 he completed his first feature film, Out of Here. The film was theatrically released at the Irish Film Institute in 2014, receiving 4-star reviews from major newspapers including the Irish Times, the Independent and the Sunday Business Post. The Irish Times praised the film as “profound, humorous and touching” with “note-perfect performances”. At age 17, he won the title of Ireland’s Young Filmmaker of the Year, and more recently he has been nominated for the Rising Star award at the Irish Film & TV Awards, and awarded the Discovery Award from the Dublin Film Critics Circle. He’s an alumnus of the Irish National Film School and the Berlinale Talent Campus, and, since 2011, a member of the Brooklyn Filmmakers Collective. As a film critic, he has written for many publications including Cahiers du Cinema and Filmmaker Magazine, and as a teaching artist, he was worked with public school students across New York City for the Tribeca Film Institute among other organizations.

Arthur MacCaig
Born in Weehawken, New Jersey in 1948, but living most of his life in Paris, Arthur MacCaig directed and produced political documentaries for cinema and TV, beginning in 1978. He received a degree in anthropology from the University of Hawaii in 1971, and a degree from France’s National School of Cinema in 1977. He is best remembered for his debut feature (and film school graduate project), The Patriot Game (1979), a visceral analysis of the conflict in Northern Ireland and one of the first films to passionately portray the Northern Irish nationalist perspective. Produced by Iskra, the French film collective founded by Chris Marker, it was described as “thorough and thoughtful” by Janet Maslin in the New York Times and “informative, vivid and partisan” by J. Hoberman in the Village Voice. It was also described by the UK Foreign Office as “damaging and highly critical of Her Majesty’s Government”. MacCaig would go on to make seven more films in Northern Ireland, harting the evolution of the struggle over a 25 year period, earning unprecedented access to the underground Irish Republican Army. He would also make several films about another nationalist struggle, that of the BasqueSpanish conflict, beginning in 1984 with Euskadi: the Stateless Nation, which premiered at the Cannes Film Festival and was described as “serious, intelligent, and effective” by Libération.

Although never produced, MacCaig was also the author of several feature-length screenplays co-written with journalist Stéphane Gillet, mostly based on his experiences  filming in the Basque region and Northern Ireland. He died in Belfast in 2008.

Festivals
International Film Festival Rotterdam, IFFR
Dublin International Film Festival
BAFICI Film Festival