To Your Good Heart

To Your Good Heart
À vot’ bon coeur

 

France | 2004 | DCP | Color | 93 min | Paul Vecchiali

THURSDAY 3 | CINETECA NACIONAL SALA 9 | 21:00 HRS | 95 MIN

Director: Paul Vecchiali
Screenplay: Paul Vecchiali
Producer: JLA Audiovisuel
Cinematography: Philippe Bottiglione
Editing: Paul Vecchiali
Music: Roland Vincent
Production Company: JLA Audiovisuel
Cast: Elsa Lepoivre, Paul Vecchiali, Mathieu Marie

Synopsis
A filmmaker (played by Paul Vecchiali), has begun working on a feature film called The Wasp, but, unable to obtain the government’s financial aid, he cannot shoot it. He decides to kill the members of the jury. His actors and technicians support him, above all, a woman who seems to be his lover. The jury is murdered, except for the president, who is warned on time, and it is the filmmaker who ends up being killed. A comedy that is also a political and aesthetic manifesto for the films that will follow, mixed up with a sort of film noir and a poetic vision of the cinema.

 

Biography
Paul Vecchiali (Corsica, 1930) is a French filmmaker and writer. Despite being a fervent admirer of the classical French cinema that was buried unjustly by the Cahiers du cinéma, he worked as a film critic for this magazine during a couple of years until he eventually directed his first feature in 1966. He went on to direct three films which were celebrated mainly by the critics and intellectuals of the time -from Serge Daney to Pier Paolo Pasolini- and then, in 1976 he created the production company Diagonale, which Serge Bozon declared the most important movement in French cinema since the Nouvelle vague. It is within this company that he produces his own films and later shelters a group of younger filmmakers whose thematical and stylistic interests were similar to his (Jean-Claude Biette, Marie-Claude Treilhou, Jean-Claude Guiguet and even Jean-Marie Straub and Danièle Huillet). After Diagonale´s collapse, in 1994, Vecchiali started a new phase of his career which is made up of amateur films shot without much financial aid and which is still running today. His films have been shown in film festivals such as Cannes, Venice, Berlin, among many others. He has also written novels and an encyclopedia in two tomes on the French cinema of the thirties.